Definition

Some users take zolpidem recreationally for these side effects. However, it may be less common than benzodiazepine abuse. In the United States, recreational use may be less common than in countries where the drug is available as a less expensive generic. Zolpidem can become addictive if taken for extended periods of time, due to dependence on its ability to put one to sleep or to the euphoria it can sometimes produce. Like most addictive drugs, a tolerance in the zolpidem user develops and increases all the more quickly the longer she or he has been regularly taking it. Under the influence of the drug it is common to take more zolpidem than is necessary due to either forgetting that one has already taken a pill (elderly users are particularly at risk here), or knowingly taking more than the prescribed dosage. Users with a predilection for abuse are advised to keep additional zolpidem in a safe place that is unlikely to be remembered or accessed while intoxicated to avoid this risk. A trustworthy friend or relative is the best defense if such people are available; otherwise, a box or cupboard locked with a combination padlock is a good defense against this tendency, as the abovementioned side-effects can easily prevent a user from operating such a lock while under the drug's influence; Zolpidem is a prescription drug used for the short-term treatment of insomnia. It works quickly (usually within 15 minutes) and has a short half-life (2-3 hours). Some trade names of zolpidem are Ambien, Stilnox, Stilnoct, Hypnogen or Myslee. Its hypnotic effects are similar to those of the benzodiazepines, but it is classified as an imidazopyridine, and the anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant effects only appear at 10 and 20 times the dose required for sedation, respectively. For that reason, it has never been approved for either muscle relaxation or seizure prevention. Such drastically increased doses are more likely to induce one or more negative side effects, including hallucinations and/or amnesia. (See below.); Some users take zolpidem recreationally for these side effects. However, it may be less common than benzodiazepine abuse. In the United States, recreational use may be less common than in countries where the drug is available as a less expensive generic. Zolpidem can become addictive if taken for extended periods of time, due to dependence on its ability to put one to sleep or to the euphoria it can sometimes produce. Like most addictive drugs, a tolerance in the zolpidem user develops and increases all the more quickly the longer she or he has been regularly taking it. Under the influence of the drug it is common to take more zolpidem than is necessary due to either forgetting that one has already taken a pill (elderly users are particularly at risk here), or knowingly taking more than the prescribed dosage. Users with a predilection for abuse are advised to keep additional zolpidem in a safe place that is unlikely to be remembered or accessed while intoxicated to avoid this risk. A trustworthy friend or relative is the best defense if such people are available; Recreational zolpidem use is speculated to lead to tolerance and dependence much more quickly than prescribed use. Recreational use is rising, as demonstrated by the use of street names for the pill, such as: 'A' (which is most likely due to the imprint on the Ambien CR brand of zolpidem, which consists of a capital A along with a tilde, which looks roughly like A~, as well as for sedative and calming effects, 'A+' is a street name for Adderall, named so because of its stimulant effects) and 'zombie pills' (because of the waking sleep/sensory deprivation effect some users have reported experiencing). Another buzz term for Ambien is 'tic-tacs', referring to the shape and color of commonly abused 10mg tablets; Zolpidem is a prescription drug used for the short-term treatment of insomnia. It works quickly (usually within 15 minutes) and has a short half-life (2-3 hours). Its hypnotic effects are similar to those of the benzodiazepines, but it is actually classified as an imidazopyridine, and the anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant effects only appear at 10 and 20 times the dose required for sedation, respectively.[2] For that reason, it has never been approved for either muscle relaxation or seizure prevention. Such drastically increased doses are likely to induce one or more negative side effects, including hallucinations and/or amnesia.; Zolpidem is a prescription drug used for the short-term treatment of insomnia. It works quickly (usually within 15 minutes) and has a short half-life (2-3 hours). Some trade names of zolpidem are Ambien, Stilnox, Stilnoct, Hypnogen or Myslee. Its hypnotic effects are similar to those of the benzodiazepines, but it is actually classified as an imidazopyridine, and the anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant effects only appear at 10 and 20 times the dose required for sedation, respectively. For that reason, it has never been approved for either muscle relaxation or seizure prevention. Such drastically increased doses are more inclined to induce one or more negative side effects, including hallucinations and/or amnesia. (See below.); otherwise, a box or cupboard locked with a combination padlock is a good defense against this tendency, as the abovementioned side-effects can easily prevent a user from operating such a lock while under the drug's influence. [HMDB]

Description

Zolpidem (sold under the brand names Ambien, Ambien CR, Stilnox, and Sublinox) is a prescription medication used for the treatment of insomnia, as well as some brain disorders. It is a short-acting nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic of the imidazopyridine class that potentiates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter, by binding to GABAA receptors at the same location as benzodiazepines. It works quickly (usually within 15 minutes) and has a short half-life (two to three hours). Zolpidem has not adequately demonstrated effectiveness in maintaining sleep (unless delivered in a controlled-release form); however, it is effective in initiating sleep. Some users take zolpidem recreationally for these side effects. However, it may be less common than benzodiazepine abuse. Zolpidem can become addictive if taken for extended periods of time, due to dependence on its ability to put one to sleep or to the euphoria it can sometimes produce.

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