Definition

An important regulator of GENE EXPRESSION during growth and development, and in NEOPLASMS. Tretinoin, also known as retinoic acid and derived from maternal VITAMIN A, is essential for normal GROWTH; and EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT. An excess of tretinoin can be teratogenic. It is used in the treatment of PSORIASIS; ACNE VULGARIS; and several other SKIN DISEASES. It has also been approved for use in promyelocytic leukemia (LEUKEMIA, PROMYELOCYTIC, ACUTE). Retinoic acid is the oxidized form of Vitamin A. It functions in determining position along embryonic anterior/posterior axis in chordates. It acts through Hox genes, which ultimately controls anterior/posterior patterning in early developmental stages (PMID: 17495912). It is an important regulator of gene expression during growth and development, and in neoplasms. Tretinoin, also known as retinoic acid and derived from maternal vitamin A, is essential for normal growth and embryonic development. An excess of tretinoin can be teratogenic. It is used in the treatment of psoriasis; acne vulgaris; and several other skin diseases. It has also been approved for use in promyelocytic leukemia (leukemia, promyelocytic, acute). [HMDB]

Description

Tretinoin, also known as all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), is a naturally occurring derivative of vitamin A (retinol). Retinoids such as tretinoin are important regulators of cell reproduction, proliferation, and differentiation and are used to treat acne and photodamaged skin and to manage keratinization disorders such as ichthyosis and keratosis follicularis. Tretinoin also represents the class of anticancer drugs called differentiating agents and is used in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL).

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Related Pathways

General Information

Mechanism of Action

Tretinoin Interacts with Diseases