Definition

A selective blocker of DOPAMINE D2 RECEPTORS and SEROTONIN 5-HT2 RECEPTORS that acts as an atypical antipsychotic agent. It has been shown to improve both positive and negative symptoms in the treatment of SCHIZOPHRENIA. Risperidone is an atypical antipsychotic medication approved in 1993. It is most often used to treat delusional psychosis (including schizophrenia), but risperidone (like other atypical antipsychotics) is also used to treat some forms of bipolar disorder, psychotic depression and Tourette syndrome. Generally lower doses are used for autistic spectrum disorders than are used for schizophrenia and other forms of psychosis; Risperidone is a very strong dopamine blocker (antagonist); Risperidone is a very strong dopamine blocker (antagonist); i.e., it inhibits functioning of postsynaptic dopamine receptors.; An anxiolytic agent and a serotonin receptor agonist belonging to the azaspirodecanedione class of compounds. Its structure is unrelated to those of the benzodiazepines, but it has an efficacy comparable to diazepam; i.e., it inhibits functioning of postsynaptic dopamine receptors.; Risperidone (Belivon, Rispen, Risperdal; in the United States) is an atypical antipsychotic medication. It was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1993. It is most often used to treat delusional psychosis (including schizophrenia), but risperidone (like other atypical antipsychotics) is also used to treat some forms of bipolar disorder, psychotic depression and Tourette syndrome; risperidone has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for symptomatic treatment of irritability in autistic children and adolescents. Risperidone is now the most commonly prescribed antipsychotic medication in the United States. [HMDB]

Description

Risperidone is an atypical antipsychotic medication approved in 1993. It is most often used to treat delusional psychosis (including schizophrenia), but risperidone (like other atypical antipsychotics) is also used to treat some forms of bipolar disorder, psychotic depression and Tourette syndrome. Generally lower doses are used for autistic spectrum disorders than are used for schizophrenia and other forms of psychosis; Risperidone is a very strong dopamine blocker (antagonist); Risperidone is a very strong dopamine blocker (antagonist); i.e., it inhibits functioning of postsynaptic dopamine receptors. An anxiolytic agent and a serotonin receptor agonist belonging to the azaspirodecanedione class of compounds. Its structure is unrelated to those of the benzodiazepines, but it has an efficacy comparable to diazepam; i.e., it inhibits functioning of postsynaptic dopamine receptors. Risperidone (Belivon, Rispen, Risperdal; in the United States) is an atypical antipsychotic medication. It was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1993. It is most often used to treat delusional psychosis (including schizophrenia), but risperidone (like other atypical antipsychotics) is also used to treat some forms of bipolar disorder, psychotic depression and Tourette syndrome; risperidone has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for symptomatic treatment of irritability in autistic children and adolescents. Risperidone is now the most commonly prescribed antipsychotic medication in the United States.

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