Definition

A phenothiazine with actions similar to CHLORPROMAZINE but with less antipsychotic activity. It is primarily used in short-term treatment of disturbed behavior and as an antiemetic.

Description

Promazine is only found in individuals that have used or taken this drug. It is a phenothiazine with actions similar to chlorpromazine but with less antipsychotic activity. It is primarily used in short-term treatment of disturbed behavior and as an antiemetic. Promazine is an antagonist at types 1, 2, and 4 dopamine receptors, 5-HT receptor types 2A and 2C, muscarinic receptors 1 through 5, alpha(1)-receptors, and histamine H1-receptors. Promazine's antipsychotic effect is due to antagonism at dopamine and serotonin type 2 receptors, with greater activity at serotonin 5-HT2 receptors than at dopamine type-2 receptors. This may explain the lack of extrapyramidal effects. Promazine does not appear to block dopamine within the tubero-infundibular tract, explaining the lower incidence of hyperprolactinemia than with typical antipsychotic agents or risperidone. Antagonism at muscarinic receptors, H1-receptors, and alpha(1)-receptors also occurs with promazine.

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