Definition

A cinnamate derivative of the shikamate pathway found in CLOVE OIL and other PLANTS. Very widespread occurrence in essential oils. Major component of clove oil. Also found in citrus and thyme oils. Present in apple, apricot, banana and cherry fruits. Flavouring agent Eugenol (C10H12O2), is an allyl chain-substituted guaiacol. Eugenol is a member of the phenylpropanoids class of chemical compounds. It is a clear to pale yellow oily liquid extracted from certain essential oils especially from clove oil, nutmeg, cinnamon, and bay leaf[citation needed]. It is slightly soluble in water and soluble in organic solvents. It has a pleasant, spicy, clove-like aroma.; Eugenol is an allyl chain-substituted guaiacol, i.e. 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl)phenol. Eugenol is a member of the allylbenzene class of chemical compounds. It is a clear to pale yellow oily liquid extracted from certain essential oils especially from clove oil, nutmeg, cinnamon, and bay leaf. It is slightly soluble in water and soluble in organic solvents. It has a pleasant, spicy, clove-like odor.; Eugenol is used in perfumeries, flavorings, essential oils and in medicine as a local antiseptic and anaesthetic. It was used in the production of isoeugenol for the manufacture of vanillin, though most vanillin is now produced from petrochemicals or from by-products of paper manufacture (Wikipedia).; Eugenol is used in perfumeries, flavorings, essential oils and in medicine as a local antiseptic and anesthetic. It is a key ingredient in Indonesian kretek (clove) cigarettes. It was used in the production of isoeugenol for the manufacture of vanillin, though most vanillin is now produced from phenol or from lignin.; It is one of many compounds that is attractive to males of various species of orchid bees, who apparently gather the chemical to synthesize pheromones; it is commonly used as bait to attract and collect these bees for study.

Description

Eugenol is an allyl chain-substituted guaiacol, i.e. 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl)phenol. Eugenol is a member of the allylbenzene class of chemical compounds. It is a clear to pale yellow oily liquid extracted from certain essential oils especially from clove oil, nutmeg, cinnamon, and bay leaf. It is slightly soluble in water and soluble in organic solvents. It has a pleasant, spicy, clove-like odor. Eugenol is used in perfumeries, flavorings, essential oils and in medicine as a local antiseptic and anaesthetic. It was used in the production of isoeugenol for the manufacture of vanillin, though most vanillin is now produced from petrochemicals or from by-products of paper manufacture (Wikipedia).

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